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#MyHealth: A Promoted Hashtag Done Right

#MyHealth.

That’s today’s promoted Twitter hashtag from @SiemensUSA.

I’m not normally a fan of the promoted tweets or trending topics on Twitter. They never seem to be done genuinely or even in a smart fashion. I’ve really only noticed the ones that turned out to be horribly negative for the company – much like the #ILoveWalgreens hashtag that comedians picked up on immediately to detrimental (though hilarious results) or the #McDStories hashtag that had people sharing their horror stories of eating at the fast food giant.

But I am a big fan of giving people credit where credit is due and @SiemensUSA used their promoted hashtag wonderfully.

Full disclosure: I was already predisposed to like this hashtag on this particular day. As I’ve stated before on this blog I suffer from chronic daily migraine headaches and today happens to be my 11 year anniversary with the disease. While I’m always mindful of my health, April 10 kicks it into high gear as I think about everything I’ve been through to get me functioning at the high level that I do today.

So, when I was scrolling through my twitter feed and saw a promoted tweet by Siemens asking me what my health means to me I had to respond. My health is personal and I want doctors and insurance companies to recognize that I am a person and not just a number or a dollar sign.

You know what else I want to be personal? My social media.

Instead of allowing all of these response tweets about #MyHealth to head into an abyss, Siemens played their cards excellently. They retweeted my original tweet which is always exciting because it helps you realize there’s a person behind that huge company. So I tweeted again. And when I once again received an interaction I gave them props on twitter – which they personally responded to thanking me for adding to the conversation.

Now all of this might seem like small dice to others. Maybe my readers don’t actually care when corporations retweet or @reply to them. But today, when I am incredibly introspective about my own health, to have someone else recognize that same desire to be seen as a person is fantastic.

The best part about Siemens’ promoted hashtag is that anyone can get in on the fun. There are a lot of individuals responding with their own Health issues or ideas, but there are also yoga instructors, specific illness awareness groups, doctors, healthcare organizations and yes, even software providers getting in on the action. And here’s the coolest thing – Siemens isn’t ignoring these people. They’re fostering conversation and community by retweeting anyone that adds to the conversation.

They’re showing that Siemens isn’t a faceless automaton. It’s a company full of people and, more importantly, it’s a company full of people who care what we say.

They’re using social media marketing in the best way possible. They’re fostering interaction with others and they’re garnering the attention of people who might not have heard of Siemens before. The entire campaign is driving awareness of their sponsorship of TEDMED, a three and a half day conference exploring the ideas, innovations and challenges that will help shape the future of health and medicine.

Were it not for the #MyHealth hashtag, I wouldn’t have known TEDMED was even occurring this week, let alone that Siemens was sponsoring it.

I’d love to see their metrics once this campaign calms down. It’d be fascinating to know if they consider the hashtag to be as successful as I do, but regardless, they have a new fan in me.

So what did Siemens do right?

  1. Chose a hashtag that has meaning to everyone: They could have chosen to promote #TEDMED. It would have alerted the Twitterverse that they are sponsoring the event and possibly had some clickthroughs, but only people at the conference would  be interacting with them. #MyHealth is something everyone is either interested in discussing or interested in degrading.
  2. Monitored the social media to highlight tweets that add to the conversation. They further prove the adage that content isn’t king, GOOD content is.
  3. Responded to direct praise and questions on social media, furthering the conversation.
  4. They were HUMAN about the interaction. Anyone who reads the full #MyHealth search feed knows there are people that aren’t using #MyHealth the way Siemens wants them to. Instead of trying to silence the detractors they have done enough work to promote positive conversation that the positive drowns out the negative on Twitter.

So thank you Siemens, for proving to me that I’m not crazy when I think that an organization can have a successful social media campaign. And for showing me that promoted tweets and hashtags on Twitter aren’t all a bad idea.

Post By Liz Harter (69 Posts)

Liz Harter has a degree in English Writing with a minor in Spanish from Saint Mary’s College in Notre Dame, Ind. She is an award winning journalist on the collegiate level with a strong background in journalism. She currently works in PR and is a social media autodidact Google+

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About the Author

Liz Harter has a degree in English Writing with a minor in Spanish from Saint Mary’s College in Notre Dame, Ind. She is an award winning journalist on the collegiate level with a strong background in journalism. She currently works in PR and is a social media autodidact Google+

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  1. Jim in Cincinnati says:

    Good blog – did not know you were authoring this!

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